Saskatoon women recognized for Idle No More movement

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February 24, 2013 - 10:40am
Protesters take part in a round dance on the Albert Street Bridge.  Courtney Mintenko/CJME News.
Protesters take part in a round dance on the Albert Street Bridge. Courtney Mintenko/CJME News.

Four First Nations women from Saskatoon are being recognized for their role in starting the Idle No More movement.

Sheelah McLean, Sylvia McAdam, Nina Wilson and Jessica Gordon have been awarded the Carole Geller Human Rights Award for turning the #idlenomore twitter hashtag into a national movement.  The prize comes with a $2,000 cash prize to go towards the cause.

The women planned the November 2012 rally in Saskatoon that protested against Bill C-45.  Soon, similar protests and rallies popped up  across Canada.

"There's a shift happening (now)," said Sylvia McAdam.  Although she's grateful for the award and recognition, McAdam says she's much busier now than she was when the movement began.

"We're being invited to the churches, we're being invited into the schools.  Our allies are stepping up and that is so exciting."

McAdam says the movement is far from over, and more work needs to be done.  They're having meetings with people and organizations about environmental standards in Canada about what work needs to be done to protect the land and water in Canada.

The Carole Geller Award is given periodically to an individual or group making an extraordinary sacrifice or involved in a particularly important human rights struggle.  This is the fifth time the award has been given.

Edited by CJME's Courtney Mintenko.

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