PHOTOS: Regina students learn about carbon capture

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September 30, 2014 - 6:47am Updated: September 30, 2014 - 9:11am
Regina students conduct science experiments at the Saskatchewan Science Centre. Kevin Martel/CJME
Regina students conduct science experiments at the Saskatchewan Science Centre. Kevin Martel/CJME

Carbon capture is so simple even a kid can understand it. At least that’s the idea behind a presentation to students at the Saskatchewan Science Centre.

About 100 grade 7 students within Regina’s Catholic School Division are learning about carbon capture and storage. The kids got to go to the Saskatchewan Science Centre Monday morning to watch a presentation in the IMAX theatre and to participate in various table-top experiments.

Students conduct science experiments at SK Science Centre. Kevin Martel/CJME
Students conduct science experiments at SK Science Centre. Kevin Martel/CJME

“Today has just been a really hands-on, very full of science experiments about what carbon dioxide is, how it’s developed, where kids can find it and then how you can capture carbon dioxide and help the environment,” explained Donna Ell, the division’s mathematics and science consultant.

This week the Government of Saskatchewan is launching a $1.4 billion facility at the Boundary Dam near Estevan. Carbon will be captured there and then stored, safely and permanently, kilometres underground.

For students at the Science Centre, they were amazed at how fun science can be while learning a few basic rules along the way too.

Students watch experiment demonstration. Kevin Martel/CJME

Students watch experiment demonstration. Kevin Martel/CJME

“Baking soda and vinegar aren’t a good mix,” said student Kaidin Eckert.

Eckert did enjoy the explosion those ingredients created, as did fellow student Erik Duvell. Students also got to witness what happens when certain substances are mixed together, some of which produced colour changes while others caused liquids to bubble and turn into a gas.

It was all in an effort to help explain to students what the province is attempting to accomplish.

“The factory that they’re making is putting the carbon dioxide into the ground like a sponge,” Duvell said.

Grade 7 students conduct experiment. Kevin Martel/CJME

Grade 7 students conduct experiment. Kevin Martel/CJME

“This is a great opportunity for the students,” said Ell. “This is a brand-new area of science and our students are some of the first to learn about it in this way and see how their home province has the attention of the world.”

The province will introduce its one-of-a-kind carbon facility on Thursday.

kmartel@rawlco.com
Follow on Twitter: @KevinMartel